Reclaiming indigenous knowledge in Namibia’s post-colonial curriculum: The case of the Mafwe people select="/dri:document/dri:meta/dri:pageMeta/dri:metadata[@element='title']/node()"/>

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dc.contributor.author Lilemba, John M.
dc.contributor.author Matemba, Yonah H.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-17T16:12:43Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-17T16:12:43Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Lilemba, J.M., & Matemba, Y.H. (2015). Reclaiming indigenous knowledge in Namibia’s post-colonial curriculum: The case of the Mafwe people. In K.C. Chinsembu, A. Cheikhyoussef, & D. Mumbengegwi (Eds.), Indigenous Knowledge of Namibia (pp. 283-310). Windhoek: UNAM Press. en_US
dc.identifier.isbn 978-99916-42-05-5
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/1796
dc.description.abstract In Namibia, as is the case in the rest of Africa, different versions of an indigenous knowledge-based education, mainly through the formal setting of traditional initiation schools, was an integral part of community life (Amukugo, 1993; Ray, 1999). The initiation school, of which attendance was compulsory, was a system of formal education with parallels to Western forms of education. For example, initiation schools had a standardized curriculum, set times of instruction, specified age of children for instruction, assessment strategies, use of ‘qualified’ instructors (experienced village elders) and formal arrangements to recognize and celebrate those who successfully completed the education (Matemba, 2010). The curriculum offered included teaching the neophytes on ‘proper’ use of language, survival skills, customs, values, marriage, parenting, religion, respect for others, etc. (Mbiti, 1999; Amanze, 2002). As numerous studies have shown, the arrival of missionaries and colonial political powers in Africa from the mid-1800s onwards and their attitudes towards African cultural institutions impacted negatively on the viability of the African indigenous system of education, which was condemned as barbaric, heathen and an impediment to the consolidation of Christianity and Western culture on the continent (Abernethy, 1969; McCracken, 1977; Nduka, 1980; Ball, 1983; Comaroff & Comaroff, 1986) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher University of Namibia Press en_US
dc.subject Post-colonial curriculum en_US
dc.subject Mafwe people en_US
dc.title Reclaiming indigenous knowledge in Namibia’s post-colonial curriculum: The case of the Mafwe people en_US
dc.type Book chapter en_US


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