Prevalence of Haemonchus contortus Infections in Sheep and Goats in Nyagatare District, Rwanda select="/dri:document/dri:meta/dri:pageMeta/dri:metadata[@element='title']/node()"/>

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dc.contributor.author Mushonga, Borden
dc.contributor.author Kandiwa, Erick
dc.contributor.author Madzingira, Oscar
dc.contributor.author Samkange, Alaster
dc.contributor.author Segwagwe, Basiamisi
dc.contributor.author Jaja, Ishmael Festus
dc.contributor.author Habumugisha, Dismas
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-20T13:14:48Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-20T13:14:48Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Mushonga, B., Habumugisha, D., Kandiwa, E., et al. Hindawi Journal of Veterinary Medicine, 1-9. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/2415
dc.description.abstract This study investigated the overall prevalence of Haemonchus contortus infection in sheep and goats from five purposively selected subdivisions (sectors) of Nyagatare district from January to December 2014, after a high prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites and generalized poor productivity was reported in small ruminants in some districts of Rwanda. Faecal egg counts (FEC) were performed using the Modified Wisconsin Sugar Floatation method and the Fluorescent-labeled peanut-lectin agglutination test while enumerations, as log (FEC), were done using themodifiedMcMastermethod.The overall prevalence of H. contortus infection in sheep and goats was 75.7% (n=949). The overall prevalence of H. contortus infection in sheep (83.4%, n=314) was higher than in goats (71.8%, n=635) (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.98, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.40-2.79, and p≤0.001).The prevalence of H. contortus infection in female goats (74.2%) was higher than in male goats (64.3%) (OR 1.60, 95% CI: 1.09-2.36, and p=0.01).The prevalence of H. contortus infection in goats fromNyagatarewas higher than in goats fromMatimba (OR3.25, 95%CI: 1.76-5.99, and p≤0.001) and from Katabagemu (OR 3.67, 95% CI: 2.04-6.59, and p≤0.001).The prevalence of H. contortus infection in goats fromKarangazi was higher than in goats fromMatimba (OR 4.72, 95%CI: 2.40-9.28, and p≤0.001).Theoverall mean monthly log (FEC) for H. contortus in sheep and goats were highest in April (18.9±0.2 and 14.05±0.1, respectively) and October (19.25± 0.2 and 13.75±0.1, respectively). Though, overall, sheep in Nyagatare district were at greater risk of H. contortus infection and goats from Nyagatare and Karangazi sectors were paradoxically at greater risk of H. contortus infection. It was also apparent that young female goats were at greater risk of H. contortus infection than young male goats. H. contortus infection is endemic in small ruminants in Nyagatare district and possibly other districts in Rwanda. Targeted selective treatment (TST) using FAMACHA with emphasis on low-lying swampy pastures and appropriate anthelmintic drugs may be the most economically viable solution in the short term. In the long term breeding of H. contortus resistant small ruminants and strategic grazing using the concept of refugia may bring about considerable relief from H. contortus infection in Nyagatare district, in particular, and Rwanda at large. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Haemonchus en_US
dc.subject Goats en_US
dc.subject Sheep en_US
dc.title Prevalence of Haemonchus contortus Infections in Sheep and Goats in Nyagatare District, Rwanda en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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