Assessing the effectiveness of Tuberculosis infection control in public healthcarefacilities in the Khomas region select="/dri:document/dri:meta/dri:pageMeta/dri:metadata[@element='title']/node()"/>

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dc.contributor.author Mulokoshi, Theopolina
dc.date.accessioned 2019-06-10T13:54:23Z
dc.date.available 2019-06-10T13:54:23Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/2531
dc.description A thesis submitted in fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master in Public Health en_US
dc.description.abstract Emerging multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) has become a major public health concern, placing millions at risk. Moreover, nosocomial transmission of MDR/XDR-TB places both patients and healthcare workers at an even higher risk. For these reason health facilities in high-risk settings need to implement effective tuberculosis (TB) infection prevention and control (IPC) policies/guidelines. Several studies elsewhere demonstrated that organizational processes and employee skills development are key determinants of organizational performance. The effectiveness of TB control thus implies enhanced organizational performance of the healthcare facilities. However, little research has been conducted in the Namibian to see the influence of organizational processes and employee skills development on the effectiveness of tuberculosis infection control in public healthcare setting. The method employed to conduct in the study to address the research question, was the quantitative approach, using an evaluative and descriptive research study design for the period of 2008 to 2012. The study aimed to assess the effectiveness of TB IPC and potential key determinants in public healthcare facilities. The population for this study comprised of nurses and doctors purposively selected from Windhoek Central Hospital and Katutura Intermediate Hospital (TB Hospital, including ten (10) Primary Health care clinics in Khomas region, in the geographical area of Windhoek district. These facilities were selected because of their capacities, as they perform screening, treating, referring and provide DOTS to TB patients. The Donkerhoek clinic will be used for pilot study. The sample was selected using purposive sampling technique. The sample included all categories of the nurses and medical doctors who were willing, available and legible to the study. A total of hundred (100) nurses of all categories and doctors participated in this study. Data collection was conducted with a self-designed questionnaire which was self-administered by consenting study participants. . The duration of data collection took eight (8) months, due to the nature of the work condition of the health care workers. The response rate was 100%. No missing data were recorded. The research instrument was found to be reliable. Data analysis technique involved the use of Statistical Package for the Social Sciences ( SPSS) a statistical software to carry out both descriptive and inferential statistics with significance set at P>0.05. As inferential statistics, the study used Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression analysis to determine the strength of each relationship hypothesized by the study model. Ethical consideration adhered to in the study. The findings revealed a positive influence of organizational processes and employee skills development on the effectiveness of tuberculosis infection control in public healthcare facilities in the Khomas region. In conclusion the recommendations are that the public healthcare facilities should therefore train key personnel in the aspects of TB IPC concepts. It should also implement appropriate organizational process to ensure that the process effectively support TB IPC policy implementation. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher University of Namibia en_US
dc.subject Tuberculosis en_US
dc.subject Public health care facilities en_US
dc.title Assessing the effectiveness of Tuberculosis infection control in public healthcarefacilities in the Khomas region en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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