A literary exploration of ethnocentric segregation and discrimination in Bessie Head's Maru and Gasebalwe Seretse's The Pursuit of Xhai select="/dri:document/dri:meta/dri:pageMeta/dri:metadata[@element='title']/node()"/>

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dc.contributor.author Shigwedha, Hilde
dc.date.accessioned 2020-09-10T12:52:36Z
dc.date.available 2020-09-10T12:52:36Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/2870
dc.description A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in English Studies en_US
dc.description.abstract This literary thesis explored ethnocentric segregation and discrimination in Bessie Head’s Maru and Gasebalwe Seretse’s The Pursuit of Xhai. The purpose of the study was to investigate the causes and effects of ethnocentric segregation and discrimination amongst ethnic groups as presented in the selected novels. The study was primarily a qualitative desktop research whereby two novels were purposefully selected and analysed. This analysis was informed by the integrated or intergroup threat theory. Integrated or intergroup threat theory posits that perceptions of threat are significant when considering prejudice and discrimination towards non-dominant groups. It focuses particularly on the conditions that led to perceptions of threat, which in turn have an impact on attitudes and behaviour. In addition, if individuals feel threatened during an intercultural interaction, including fear of being rejected, embarrassed, ridiculed or exploited by out-group members, unfavourable attitudes towards out-groups are likely to occur. The findings of this study revealed that the Masarwa people appear to be active in eradicating segregation and discrimination by keeping their cultural pride and applying their natural talent of communicating to Mother Earth in escaping danger. Although at some points they were victimised as a low filthy nation and untouchable to the locals, their natural beauty and intelligence brought a bond of a good and loving relationship with the superior ethnic groups. On the other hand, the non-Masarwa people who were against ethnic segregation and discrimination amongst ethnic groups managed to overcome all the challenges from their counterparts. They supported the Masarwa people and protected them warmly in every chaotic situation that occurred. This study recommends that further research should be done to analyse how the Namibian writers portrayed ethnocentric segregation and discrimination in literary genres and further research should also be conducted in other genres of African literature to explore the theme of ethnocentric segregation in Africa. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher University of Namibia en_US
dc.subject Literary exploration en_US
dc.subject Ethnocentric segregation en_US
dc.subject Discrimination en_US
dc.title A literary exploration of ethnocentric segregation and discrimination in Bessie Head's Maru and Gasebalwe Seretse's The Pursuit of Xhai en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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