Well-being of educators in selected secondary schools in Namibia. select="/dri:document/dri:meta/dri:pageMeta/dri:metadata[@element='title']/node()"/>

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dc.contributor.author Janik, Manfred
dc.date.accessioned 2014-05-22T10:46:00Z
dc.date.available 2014-05-22T10:46:00Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.other thesis
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/925
dc.description A dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. en_US
dc.description.abstract This study focussed on job and personal factors that educators (N = 502) in Namibian secondary schools need for increased work engagement, positive work outcomes and decreased intention to resign. A quantitative approach with a field survey design has been used with a non-random convenience sample of educators. Measurement instruments used were: Antecedents Scale, Work-role Fit Scale, Psychological Conditions Scale, Work Engagement Scale, Organizational Commitment Scale, Turnover Intention Scale, the Organizational Citizenship Behaviour Scale and a biographical questionnaire. Measurement models were tested using confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses. Descriptive statistics, internal consistencies of measures and correlations were analysed (using SPSS 19.0). Multivariate analyses of variance and hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to test direct and indirect effects of independent variables on mediators and dependent variables. The findings indicated that work-role fit and job enrichment, via psychological meaningfulness, had the strongest effects on the work engagement of educators. Work-role fit, job enrichment and resources affected emotional engagement. Commitment was affected by work-role fit, job enrichment, co-worker relations, supervisor support, sense of coherence, psychological meaningfulness and autonomy. Educator turnover increased with poor work-role fit, lack of personal resources, a weak sense of coherence and lack of psychological meaningfulness. Male (compared with female) educators experienced higher levels of depression. Female (compared with male) educators struggled with somatic complaints, social dysfunction and anxiety. Principals and Heads of Departments showed the highest organizational citizenship. Concerning age groups, educators older than 55 years showed highest work-role fit, where-as educators under the age of 35 indicated lowest work-role fit. Poor co-worker relations, low psychological safety, a weak sense of coherence and a lack of personal resources contributed to somatic symptoms. Poor co-worker relations, low job enrichment, lack of resources, weak sense of coherence, feeling unsafe and not feeling psychologically available impacted anxiety/insomnia. Poor work role fit, poor job enrichment, poor co-worker relations, low supervisor support, lack of resources, weak sense of coherence, low psychological availability and low autonomy increased social dysfunction. Low personal resources, a weak sense of coherence and a lack of psychological safety contributed significantly to depression. Indirect effects indicated that psychological safety (feeling rejected) transferred the effects of poor work-role fit, co-worker relations, cognitive resources and sense of coherence to somatic symptoms. Psychological safety (not feeling appreciated) transferred the effects of poor co-worker relations and a lack of physical/emotional resources to somatic symptoms. Psychological availability influenced the relationship between work-role fit, job enrichment and cognitive resources on the one hand and anxiety on the other hand. Psychological safety (feeling of rejection) influenced the relationship between work-role fit, co-worker relations, cognitive resources and sense of coherence on the one hand and anxiety on the other hand. Psychological availability influenced the relationship between work-role fit, job enrichment and cognitive resources on the one hand and social dysfunction on the other hand. Psychological availability also influenced the relationship between job enrichment and supervisor trust on the one hand and social dysfunction on the other hand. Psychological safety (feeling rejected) influenced the relationship between work-role fit, co-worker relations, cognitive resources and sense of coherence on the one hand and depression on the other hand. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Well-being of educators en_US
dc.title Well-being of educators in selected secondary schools in Namibia. en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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