The effects of the government's microfinance grant scheme on rural micro entrepreneurship development in Namibia: A case study of the Ohangwena region select="/dri:document/dri:meta/dri:pageMeta/dri:metadata[@element='title']/node()"/>

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dc.contributor.author Hasheela, Toini Tuutaleni
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-10T11:01:33Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-10T11:01:33Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/2475
dc.description A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Masters Degree in Business Administration (Natural Resource Management) en_US
dc.description.abstract Micro enterprises are the major sources of entrepreneurial skills, innovation and economic development. They are a very important aspect in Namibia as they have potential to contribute over 30% to the country’s Gross National Product if they are provided with financial assistance. This study was aimed at assessing the effects of the government’s microfinance grant scheme on rural micro entrepreneurship development, identify the characteristics of micro enterprises funded and determine other non-finance factors that negatively impacts the growth of micro enterprises, with a special reference to Ohangwena Region. A case study research design was adopted and primary data was collected using researcher administered questionnaires from 42 enterprises which were randomly sampled. The study made use of both descriptive and inferential statistics in drawing conclusions from the study’s findings. The effects of microfinance on rural entrepreneurship development (as a measure of change in income and a change in employment) was analysed using Linear Regression. The study found out that there is a significant relationship between microfinance and income while there is an insignificant relationship between microfinance and employment. In addition, microfinance has led to social and psychological empowerment, acquisition of assets and innovation. The study further revealed that most enterprises are not registered with any authority, not family owned and use basic technology in producing goods and service. Moreover, the study revealed that lack of individual or managerial capacity, geographical position and undeveloped infrastructures are the most non-financial factors that negatively affect businesses. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher University of Namibia en_US
dc.subject Microfinance en_US
dc.title The effects of the government's microfinance grant scheme on rural micro entrepreneurship development in Namibia: A case study of the Ohangwena region en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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