Ethnobotanical survey and in vitro evaluation of antimicrobial activity of plants traditionally used as herbs and spices from Kabbe constituencies in Zambezi region, Namibia select="/dri:document/dri:meta/dri:pageMeta/dri:metadata[@element='title']/node()"/>

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dc.contributor.author Tomas, Abner
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-18T06:29:49Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-18T06:29:49Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/2759
dc.description A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Masters of Science in Microbiology (Biological Sciences) en_US
dc.description.abstract The aims of this study were to conduct an ethnobotanical survey on indigenous knowledge of plants traditionally used as herbs and spices in Kabbe constituencies of the Zambezi region, evaluate their antimicrobial activity, determine their synergistic effects, and further elucidate their potential mechanism of action. Using semi-structured interviews and closed-end questionnaires, ethnobotanical data were collected from local informants in fourteen villages of Kabbe constituencies between December 2018 and April 2019. Plant samples were extracted with 1:1 ratio of dichloromethane:methanol (DCM:MeOH) and double distilled water before evaluated against laboratory strains of Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus vulgaris using disc diffusion assay, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), time-kill synergistic study, permeability of cell membrane, and measurement of release of 260 nm absorbing materials and proteins. Twenty-three plant species belonging to 16 plant families were documented. Cleome gynandra (83.8) and Hibiscus mechowii (77.9) were widely used species. DCM:MeOH extracts of C. gynandra had the lowest MIC value of 6.25 mg/mL against both B. cereus, E. faecalis, E. coli, C. perfringens, S. typhimurium, P. aeruginosa, P. vulgaris, C. albicans and S. cerevisiae. Meanwhile, the water extracts of Eucalyptus sp. showed the lowest MIC value of 6.25 mg/mL against both E. coli, S. typhimurium and P. vulgaris. Twenty-three synergistic effects were observed with S. cerevisiae, S. typhimurium, S. aureus, P. vulgaris, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, and C. perfringens. The 2 × MIC of Nymphaea lotus exhibited the greatest electric conductivity at 4 and 6 hours, leaked DNA materials and proteins at 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours against C. albicans. Our results contributed data to the gap in the knowledge and availability of scientific information regarding plants traditionally used as herbs and spices in Kabbe constituencies of the Zambezi region. Toxicity studies are needed to support the safe usage of these plants as food additives and natural preservatives for food safety applications. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher University of Namibia en_US
dc.subject Antimicrobial activity en_US
dc.subject Herbs en_US
dc.subject Kabbe constituency en_US
dc.title Ethnobotanical survey and in vitro evaluation of antimicrobial activity of plants traditionally used as herbs and spices from Kabbe constituencies in Zambezi region, Namibia en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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