Namibian prehistory: Apollo 11 art, the oldest rock art in the world select="/dri:document/dri:meta/dri:pageMeta/dri:metadata[@element='title']/node()"/>

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dc.contributor.author Gwasira, Goodman
dc.date.accessioned 2014-05-27T10:51:31Z
dc.date.available 2014-05-27T10:51:31Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.citation Gwasira, G. 2006. Namibian prehistory: Apollo 11 art, the oldest rock art in the world [Online] 16(4): 14-16. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/932
dc.description.abstract More than three quarters of human history remains unwritten either buried underground or simply encoded in archaeological features and artefacts on the surface of the ground or underwater. Archaeology enables people to interpret and write history by using methods that allow them to decode information from material culture that was left millions of years ago and that which was discarded in recent historical times. Namibia has one of the longest recognisable sequences of archaeological evidence stretching from about 3 million years to the present; thus, the largest part of Namibian history is unwritten which leaves the task of documenting it to archaeologists. In Southern Africa in general written history is very recent compared to the length of time that humans have lived in this part of the continent. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher African Magazine en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries African Magazine;4
dc.subject Prehistory en_US
dc.subject Apollo en_US
dc.subject Oldest rock en_US
dc.subject Rock art en_US
dc.subject Namibian en_US
dc.title Namibian prehistory: Apollo 11 art, the oldest rock art in the world en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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