Grappling with a post-colonial challenge: A critical analysis of Shona writers’ vision of the HIV and Aids epidemic select="/dri:document/dri:meta/dri:pageMeta/dri:metadata[@element='title']/node()"/>

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dc.contributor.author Makaudze, Godwin
dc.contributor.author Gudhlanga, Enna S.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-03-24T09:31:28Z
dc.date.available 2015-03-24T09:31:28Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.citation Makaudze, G. & Gudhlanga, E.S. (2012). Grappling with a post-colonial challenge: A critical analysis of Shona writers’ vision of the HIV and Aids epidemic. Journal for Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, 1(2): 91-101. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 2026-7215
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/1373
dc.description.abstract The post-colonial era has witnessed many African writers embarking on, among many activities, decolonisation, cultural regeneration and nation-building through their works of art. Whilst they have striven to reclaim the African’s dignity, integrity and humanity that s/he has lost through colonialism, the post-colonial era has again presented to the same writer, new challenges posed by life, among them; the HIV and Aids epidemic. Whilst many writers have been quite eloquent in conveying the experiences and effects of HIV and AIDS on the affected, what has remained elusive is the root causes of its transmission as well as ways of dealing with the epidemic. Blame has largely been shouldered on patriarchy, men and ‘their’ promiscuous behaviour on one hand, and Shona traditional customs on the other, both of which are largely victims of a new socio-economic order. The paper thus is an exposition of the social vision of selected Shona writers concerning the HIV and Aids epidemic. It seeks to establish if they have moved away from the popular yet mythical victim-blame to accord the epidemic a more holistic and informative gaze. It also seeks to ascertain whether the writers have suggested realistic and humane solutions in their works of art or they have adopted the popular but less realistic defeatist stance. The paper uses the socio-historical approach to ground its observations and arguments. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher University of Namibia en_US
dc.subject HIV & AIDS epidemic en_US
dc.subject Post-colonial challenge en_US
dc.title Grappling with a post-colonial challenge: A critical analysis of Shona writers’ vision of the HIV and Aids epidemic en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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