Level of male involvement and factors influencing involvement in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in the Oshakati, Oshana Region select="/dri:document/dri:meta/dri:pageMeta/dri:metadata[@element='title']/node()"/>

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dc.contributor.author Shiyagaya, Karolina N.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-24T13:57:26Z
dc.date.available 2016-05-24T13:57:26Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/1707
dc.description A thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Public Health en_US
dc.description.abstract The largest source of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in children is through mother-to-child transmission and the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) programme plays a big role in reducing the infection. However, its effectiveness depends on the involvement of male partners, considering the fact that men are decision-makers in many of the African families, who make important decisions that have a big impact on women’s health. Male involvement remains a challenge in most low- and middle-income countries, including Namibia. In an effort to reduce the HIV infection among infants and young children in the country, the Ministry of Health and Social Services implemented the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV programme in 2002, unfortunately, only 4.7% of the male partners managed to visit the ANC / PMTCT facilities in Oshakati District, for a period of ten years. A quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional and analytical study on the level of male involvement and factors influencing involvement in the prevention of mother -to -child transmission of HIV programme in Oshakati district was carried out. The purpose of the study was to determine the level of male involvement and factors associated with involvement in PMTCT in the Oshakati District. The objectives were to determine the level of male involvement and factors contributing to involvement in PMTCT. The population consisted of males, whose female partners were attending the antenatal care in the Oshakati District. A purposive sampling technique was used to sample 115 male partners. A pilot test was carried out before the actual data collection. Data was collected using a standardised interview questionnaire and were analysed using a Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 22. The data analysis revealed statistical significant associations between education level (0.001), age of female partners (0.002) and type of a relationship (0.005) and male involvement. Other factors identified were attitudes and beliefs about PMTCT, lack of information about PMTCT, culture, lack of trust within the relationship, time and health system. The study recommended for the multi-sectoral approach and for the appropriate changes in labour legislations, in order to improve the PMTCT outcomes. The implementation of male champion strategy should be embraced as an attempt to change the negative attitudes and beliefs by men, by making them effective educators and advocators for PMTCT. The programme should consider involving men and opinion leaders in the monitoring and evaluation exercises through community consultative meetings since the key factors that influence male involvement in PMTCT include inadequate knowledge and misconception about HIV and PMTCT. The study concluded that male partners lack knowledge about PMTCT, hence their level of involvement is limited. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher University of Namibia en_US
dc.subject Mother-to-child transmission en_US
dc.subject HIV en_US
dc.subject.lcsh AIDS (Disease) in children, Namibia.
dc.subject.lcsh AIDS (Disease), Namibia
dc.subject.lcsh AIDS (Disease), Prevention
dc.subject.lcsh Children of AIDS patients, Namibia
dc.title Level of male involvement and factors influencing involvement in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in the Oshakati, Oshana Region en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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