Prevalence of bacterial serovars contamination of chicken and beef from retail and wholesale markets by Salmonella SPP. in Windhoek, Namibia select="/dri:document/dri:meta/dri:pageMeta/dri:metadata[@element='title']/node()"/>

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dc.contributor.author Simasiku, Austin B.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-24T14:11:47Z
dc.date.available 2016-05-24T14:11:47Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/1708
dc.description A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Science (Applied Field Epidemiology) en_US
dc.description.abstract Salmonella infection in humans is a major public health problem worldwide. There is an increasing concern with this pathogen due to the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistant and potentially more pathogenic strains. Failure to control Salmonella in a country presents a potential problem for other countries. To minimise the burden of this pathogen, it is helpful to monitor Salmonella serovars distribution in many countries, implement Salmonella control measures throughout the food production chain, and monitor the effectiveness of the control measures. This study investigated the prevalence and the serovars distribution of Salmonella isolated from chicken and beef samples from retail and wholesale markets in Windhoek, Namibia. Chicken (138) and beef (138) samples were analysed for the presence of Salmonella at the Central Veterinary Laboratory in Windhoek. Out of 276 samples of chicken and beef that were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella, 7 % (n = 19) were found to be positive. In beef samples, 14 % (n = 19) were found to be positive for Salmonella. In chicken samples, 0 % (n = 0) tested positive for Salmonella. The prevalence of Salmonella in beef was higher; hence there was a significant difference (p < 0.001) between the two products. Salmonella enterica serovar Fulda was the most prevalent with 58 % (n = 11), followed by Salmonella enterica serovar Javiana with 42 % (n = 8). The prevalence rate of Salmonella was 56 % (n = 19) in the city centre markets, and maintained a prevalence rate of 0 % in the 10 other localities where samples were taken. This study has helped to bridge the gap in knowledge by establishing the prevalence rate of Salmonella in chicken and beef in retail and wholesale markets in Windhoek, Namibia. It is recommended that the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) system should be made compulsory to all local food processing establishments, including abattoirs and retail markets in the country en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher University of Namibia en_US
dc.subject Bacterial serovars contamination en_US
dc.subject Chicken and beef en_US
dc.subject Wholesale markets en_US
dc.subject Salmonella SPP en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Salmonella
dc.title Prevalence of bacterial serovars contamination of chicken and beef from retail and wholesale markets by Salmonella SPP. in Windhoek, Namibia en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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