To integrate or not: Exploring the prospects and challenges of integrating indigenous knowledge at the University of Namibia select="/dri:document/dri:meta/dri:pageMeta/dri:metadata[@element='title']/node()"/>

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dc.contributor.author Chinsembu, Grace M.
dc.contributor.author Hamunyela, Miriam N.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-17T16:30:47Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-17T16:30:47Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Chinsembu, G.M.M., & Hamunyela, M. (2015). To integrate or not: Exploring the prospects and challenges of integrating indigenous knowledge at the University of Namibia. In K.C. Chinsembu, A. Cheikhyoussef, & D. Mumbengegwi (Eds.), Indigenous Knowledge of Namibia (pp. 361-377). Windhoek: UNAM Press. en_US
dc.identifier.isbn 978-99916-42-05-5
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/1798
dc.description.abstract Namibia has a population of about 2.1 million people of which 87.5% belong to one of nine main indigenous ethnic groups: Aawambo (50.0%), vaKavango (9.0%), Ovaherero (7.0%), Damara (7.0%), Nama (5.0%), Lozi (4.0%), San (3.0%), Baster (2.0%) and Tswana (0.5%) (UNDP, 2000). In Namibia, ethnic identity is stronger than national identity, with 75% of Namibians feeling much stronger ties to people of their own ethnic group than to fellow compatriots of other ethnic groups (Shaw- Taylor, 2008). Undoubtedly, a lot of indigenous knowledge is embedded within these strong ethnic and cultural precincts. Over the past two decades, many Namibian policy makers and knowledge workers have begun to realize the importance of indigenous knowledge in the country’s development process. In 2011, the Polytechnic of Namibia hosted a three-day conference on the technology of indigenous knowledge under the theme, ‘Embracing indigenous knowledge systems into a new technology design paradigm’. During this conference, Namibians were urged to nurture the knowledge of their ancestors and ensure that it is protected and preserved. At the University of Namibia (UNAM), the Multidisciplinary Research Centre (MRC) conducts annual indigenous knowledge symposia. The MRC also has a research programme on indigenous knowledge systems (IKS), which is funded by the Ministry of Education (ME). Nowadays, more plans are being devoted to the documentation of indigenous knowledge before it disappears. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher University of Namibia Press en_US
dc.subject Indigenous knowledge en_US
dc.subject University of Namibia en_US
dc.title To integrate or not: Exploring the prospects and challenges of integrating indigenous knowledge at the University of Namibia en_US
dc.type Book chapter en_US


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