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dc.contributor.author Iipinge, Sakaria M.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-28T08:29:13Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-28T08:29:13Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.citation Iipinge, S.M. (2013). Challenges of large class teaching at the university: implications for continuos staff development activities. Namibia CPD Journal for Educators, 1(1), 105-120. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/2180
dc.description.abstract Class size is a major concern to any educational system. At university, a class of any size (small or large) appears to be an acceptable norm. However, when classes are too large, they are considered to contribute some complex challenges related to the teaching and learning process. Whether the class is big or small, instructors are expected to teach and assess students effectively. This paper presents a general reflection on the author's personal experiences with teaching two large classes at undergraduate level at a university. The paper aims at sharing this personal account of experiences with fellow educators who may find themselves in similar situations of teaching and assessing large groups of students at any level of education. Although what constitutes a large class has been a subject of debate in literature, the author adopts from previous authors to define "a large class as one in which characteristics and conditions present themselves as inter-related and collective constraints that impede meaningful teaching and learning'~ Therefore, in the context of this paper, this meaning is adopted as a working standard that sets the parameters of the discussion of the concept of a 'large class ~ Furthermore the paper is based on the critical reflective practices and experiences as the author draws most of the evidence based on narrative practices and principles. A narrative representation of the author is found to be the most appropriate method of telling this experience. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher University of Namibia en_US
dc.subject Teaching en_US
dc.subject Continuos staff development activities en_US
dc.title Challenges of large class teaching at the university: Implications for continuous staff development activities en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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