An epidemiological survey of the magnitude and local perceptions of porcine cysticercosis by two methods in Nyaruguru district, Rwanda select="/dri:document/dri:meta/dri:pageMeta/dri:metadata[@element='title']/node()"/>

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dc.contributor.author Mushonga, Borden
dc.contributor.author Habarugira, Gervais
dc.contributor.author Birori, Aloys
dc.contributor.author Kandiwa, Erick
dc.contributor.author Samkange, Alaster
dc.contributor.author Bhebhe, Evison
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-20T13:01:39Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-20T13:01:39Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Mushonga, B., Habarugira, G., Birori, A., et al. (2018). An epidemiological survey of the magnitude and local perceptions of porcine cysticercosis by two methods in Nyaruguru district, Rwanda. Veterinary Parasitology: Regional Studies and Reports, 14, 18-24. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/2414
dc.description.abstract This study investigated the magnitude of porcine cysticercosis (PC), its risk factors, economic effects and the perceptions of 80 pig farmers from Nyabimata (n=38) and Muganza (n=42) and 20 registered butchers in the Nyaruguru district of Rwanda. January to December 2013 slaughter records from Kamirabagenzi market were also analysed for PC diagnoses based on the tongue test and meat inspection. During this period, the responding farmers' records showed a tongue test-based PC magnitude (3.9%, n=984) which was lower than the collective tongue test-based PC magnitude of 9.2% (n=1720) at Kamirabagenzi (p < .05). The overall magnitude of PC based on routine meat inspection diagnosis at Kamirabagenzi was 4%. The overall magnitude of PC for respondents using Free-range production systems (7.9%) was significantly greater than for those in Semi-intensive (2.1%) and Intensive production systems (1.5%) (p < .05). Though most farmers (90%) knew that PC is zoonotic, only 22.5% of the farmers opted for treatment of PC-infected pigs and 52.5% were willing to seek veterinary inspection while the rest (25%) opted to circumvent veterinary inspection (P > .05). Most butchers (70%) indicated they would circumvent veterinary inspection and continue to slaughter PC-positive animals whilst the rest (30%) indicated they would resell PC positive animals to defray costs (P < .05). The low sensitivity and specificity of methods used for PC detection in the study, implies that this may just be the tip of an iceberg and the actual magnitude is most likely to be much higher. In conclusion, PC is endemic in the Nyaruguru district of Rwanda with a high proportion of positive animals. The condition has public health implications and is worsening the economic plight of the impoverished Nyaruguru community. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher University of Namibia en_US
dc.subject Porcine cysticercosis en_US
dc.title An epidemiological survey of the magnitude and local perceptions of porcine cysticercosis by two methods in Nyaruguru district, Rwanda en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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