Mass media, lifestyle and young adults’ (un)reflexive negotiation of social and individual identities in Windhoek select="/dri:document/dri:meta/dri:pageMeta/dri:metadata[@element='title']/node()"/>

DSpace Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Fox, Tom
dc.date.accessioned 2014-06-26T08:12:56Z
dc.date.available 2014-06-26T08:12:56Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.citation Fox, T. (2012). Mass media, lifestyle and young adults’ (un)reflexive negotiation of social and individual identities in Windhoek. Online publication. Stellenbosch: University of Stellenbosch. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11070/990
dc.description Dissertation presented for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Journalism) at Stellenbosch University
dc.description.abstract The rapidly growing presence of old and new media in postcolonial Namibia, particularly from the decade after the turn of the Millennium, has significance for cultural and identity transformations in the country. Formerly entrenched social identities, shaped by restrictive colonialism and indigenous traditions, appear to be under pressure as shifts become apparent in the face of globalisation.This thesis examines the characteristics of change from the perspective of young adults’ mediated experiences in the city of Windhoek. The research constitutes a cultural study that addresses the current knowledge gap regarding how growing local and global media presences are increasingly situated in youth identity and cultural lifestyle spaces. Degrees of reflexive response to mediated information and entertainment are examined in an attempt to understand awareness of and reaction to local and global power narratives situated in actors’ relationships with media. It was found that participants responded positively to the novelty and opportunities that global media offered for identity and lifestyle negotiations, while also revealing ontological anxieties about erosion of ‘traditional’ culture, and concern about absence of recognition and representation of the ‘local’ in global media productions. This led to the research conceptually establishing three participant orientations to media: cultural expropriationist, cultural traditionalist and cultural representationalist. The study concluded that while media seemed to be instrumental in identity and cultural change, social tension over matters of culture appeared to be emerging. Stellenbosch University http://scholar.sun.ac.za en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher University of Stellenbosch en_US
dc.source.uri http://scholar.sun.ac.za en_US
dc.subject Mass Media
dc.subject Post colonial Namibia
dc.subject Young adult identities
dc.subject Mass media and individual lifestyle
dc.title Mass media, lifestyle and young adults’ (un)reflexive negotiation of social and individual identities in Windhoek en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record